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10

There is a vast amount of open problems in real-time graphics: shadows, aliasing, reflections, global illumination, transparencies (blending order and lighting) etc. SIGGRAPH annually hosts a course called "Open Problems in Real-Time Rendering", which describes current issues in real-time graphics (mostly game dev industry standpoint). You can find last ...


8

It's fine to use photometric units as an overall scale for setting light brightnesses. However, there's a technical subtlety you should be aware of. I'll quote from a blog post I wrote on the subject last year: With RGB images, it’s important to recognize that our display devices behave more radiometrically than photometrically. A red pixel value of 255, ...


5

Computer Graphics can be divided in multiple subdomains of which I will only talk about physically-based rendering (the one I am the most familiar with and probably the one you are referring to based on the tags of the question). Physically-based rendering (also referred to as global illumination) is generally far from real time at the moment. The speed we ...


5

What you are describing is supersampling, a technique for combating aliasing (a.k.a. jaggies), which is a term from signal theory that also applies to graphics. It's a spatial domain approach. Basically it means that the sampling resolution (render target pixels in this case) makes signals with different frequencies be reconstructed as the same frequency. Or,...


3

It's not that hard. If you have just planar or angular light sources, you can think of them as one light source split into multiple chunks and the only thing to deal with is how to sample this multi-light and how to compute the PDF of the resulting samples. Picking probability First, you need to setup the picking probability $P(l)$ for each light source $l$...


3

For explicit light sampling: yep, you just evaluate the BRDF for that incoming direction and the output direction back toward the camera. There's probability involved in the case of an area light: you have to randomly choose a point on the light source, and include a factor to convert from probability density over light source area to a density over solid ...


1

Judging by the interface that would be blender: https://www.blender.org/ Please note that here is a bender-specific stackexchange site as well: https://blender.stackexchange.com/


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