8

Fourier transforms wouldn't help you with a rotation. You'd just end up having to rotate the matrix of Fourier coefficients, instead of rotating the original image. Consider for example an image made of a perfect sine wave along the x-axis with wave-vector $(k, 0)$. (The wave-vector is the spacial frequencies along the $x$ and $y$ axes). The Fourier ...


7

OpenEXR might be a good fit. You can have an arbitrary number of channels per pixel and the data types for each channel can be integers. http://www.openexr.com/


4

Yes, it is possible. Remember that a shift in space is equivalent to a linear-phase multiplication in frequency. A rotation can be accomplished by a shearing operation in one direction followed by a shearing operation in the perpendicular direction followed by a final shear in the original direction (Alan Paeth, ``A Fast Algorithm for General Raster ...


4

It speed does not matter, I suggest to use a truncated sinc or a Lanczos isotropic kernel: to compute a target pixel, you back-rotate the filter and convolve it with the image. Since it is isotropic, it is separable and you can even use a square filter parallel to the axis of the source image.


2

Probably .dds. You can store there textures array or 3d texture both can be use as array per pixel. You can try creating this textures with DxTex from DirecX SDK. Also you can look in Legacy Texture Tools from Nvidia https://developer.nvidia.com/legacy-texture-tools


2

The issue is that on your system, writing out "\n" is writing out 0x0D0A, whereas on my system, it's only writing out 0x0A. If you explicitly write out 0x0A instead of "\n" I think it will work for you. Here's a hex dump on macOS Mojave: 50 36 0A 35 31 32 20 35 31 32 0A 32 35 35 0A FF 00 00 // <- pixels start here FF 00 00 FF 00 00 FF 00 00 FF 00 ...


2

The tool seems to be generating an unofficial extended version of DDS in which the FOURCC code is replaced by a value from the D3DFORMAT enum. The code 0x0000006F translates to decimal 111, which translates to D3DFMT_R16F. The Microsoft DDS documentation notes that this is seen sometimes, although not recommended: DDS Variants There are some common ...


1

If instead of stereographic projection you can use other conformal projection. I would recommend you the "Least Squares Conformal Maps" algorithm. There are several implementations out there, including the prominent CGAL (https://doc.cgal.org/latest/Surface_mesh_parameterization/index.html).


1

A raster display draws every pixel on the screen in every frame whether there is something to show or not. A random scan display activates only those pixel which are occupied by an geometric primitive. So yes, they both use pixels, but the difference is in how they draw the pixels onto the screen.


1

The endpoint of the line doesn't extend out to the edge of the box because you're using the circle equation with a fixed radius: double x2 = x1 + (lenght * cos(radians)); double y2 = y1 + (lenght * sin(radians)); This makes the endpoint trace out a circle as the angle is changed. If you want the endpoint to be on the edge of the box, one way is to set up ...


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