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5

Yes, there's a better approach than using a screen recorder. You can capture frames directly inside Unity, using ScreenCapture.CaptureScreenshot. There's a choice of formats to save as, and you can use PNG so that, when you later assemble the frames into a video (using ffmpeg or another tool), you have full control over how much compression to use. This ...


4

The CT5 was designed before 1981. I started working at E&S in May 1981. The CT5 was fully designed by then and 3 had been built. All 3 were still at E&S and hadn't shipped yet when I started. Two of them were on the test floor and the third was the engineering prototype that was later sold. The prototype was in the "snake room", so called because of ...


3

After some searching on the internet, I am fairly certain that it was made in 1981 or at least the same decade. I have found multiple sources that indicate the CT5 was made in or around the year 1981. The first bit is in one of the promotional videos they made. At the very end there is a copyright statement. "(C) November, 1981". I would already believe ...


3

The effect is called chromatic aberration; the way it’s usually done in games, and what’s being done there, is by reading the red / green / blue channels of an image at different offset positions. As with your other question (you’re looking to get into the NFT market, I’m guessing?), there are most likely plugins for After Effects that will let you create ...


3

Elaboration on temporal solve: I don't have much concrete info for you, but I'm drawing from the idea of "temporal anti aliasing". Basically, if a camera was stationary, you could average pixel values over the last N frames, possibly using harmonic mean or something else like that to help filter out spikes. The result would be a cleaner, less noisy, more ...


2

The closest thing I know of to the "computer: enhance!" trope in real life is the family of Single Image Super-Resolution techniques. That page shows a number of examples of the results on various images. You can see that while it improves the visual quality of the enlarged images, it's a long way from what you see on TV where they can read the text on a ...


2

A fairly basic but effective technique is median filtering. For video, you can apply it (spatio)temporally by replacing the value of each pixel in each frame by the median of the values of the pixel (and its neighbors) in the current and the N previous and later frames. A nice feature of median filtering is that it preserves linear edges (and, when used ...


1

In 2009 it seems there was a development of an hierarchical and comparison motion detection algorithm that was proposed in this paper: Motion detection: fast and robust algorithms for embedded systems They managed to get a decent reduction of noise, as you can see in the last image of the paper. It seems it's the "morphological post-processing" that ...


1

It is likely somewhat possible, depending on how the video was encoded. The player can easily skip displaying half the frames but that won't gain us much. What needs to happen is to skip decoding some of the frames. Modern video codecs nearly all use a mix of I, P and B frames. Most are quite flexible in which frame types are used and only specify what a ...


1

You could try to play 1080p and 2160p videos, possibly 60fps in YouTube. If you right-click on the playback window and click on "Stats for nerds" you will get more information about used video and audio codecs and dropped frames, which can indicate that your hardware may be too slow. Currently the videos are mostly encoded as VP9 codec, but you can change ...


1

There are plenty of algorithms for generating meshes from point clouds. I am going to suggest looking at the libraries CGAL and PCL, if only because their documentation has excellent references which should give you ideas on where to look in the literature if you need to roll your own. Jonathan Shewchuk also has some more 2.5D-ish algorithms that may suit ...


1

Depending on your application, you could use image-based solutions that are much cheaper than meshing a uniformly sampled set of points. For example, you could use the depth map as a height map. There are many techniques that allow you to render it in an efficient way, the more realistic the more difficult to code as a shader (but not too much). From ...


1

I would be tempted to use a solution which involves decoding a single rectangular video stream so you don't need any special video decoder. As you have said there will be performance penalties for decoding multiple seperate streams. Something like octohedran cube maps might be a good offline way to convert 6 video streams into a single video stream while ...


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