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4

This is a very common question that most people in your situation (interested or fascinated shall I say in Computer Graphics) have and a problem they want to figure out. The solution is pretty simple, though not necessarily that straightforward to implement. I can't make a specific answer because it depends on the OS you are using, and as I said this is not ...


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General answer is that creating a window as a GUI element with some GUI designer library involves subclassing some basic GUI element (like widget in QtCreator for example) with class providing handling GL context in more or less user friendly way (like QOpenGLWidget in QtCreator which provide some user friendly wrapper or on the other hand basic Win32 API ...


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Scale the object proportional to its depth (z in camera space) and it will retain the same size on screen regardless of its position in world space. Additionally, you might also wish to scale the object proportional to the field of view so that it retains the same screen size regardless of the camera zoom. (Specifically, scale it by tan(fov/2)). Finally, ...


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At one point I had a similiar issue, however, I was using DirectX as opposed to OpenGL so this may not be very helpful but you might be able to gain some knowledge out of this. My main objective was to create a level editor with basic functionality such as importing models and postioning. I wanted to use C# and WinForms rather than having to learn another ...


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Some of the easy to use GUI libraries for OpenGL I have come across are (in no specific order): imGUI NanoGUI AntTweakBar Although AntTweakBar is bit outdated, it's still pretty easy to use. imGUI is definitely the one you should have a look at once. I personally haven't used NanoGUI but have heard good things about it. Hope this helps.


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I'm not sure of the current state of the art, but this style of drawing windows with rounded corners originated in the NeWS graphical environment for Unix workstations. And it was accompanied by an additional nonstandard operator arcto into Sun's customized PostScript dialect which was then adopted into PostScript Level 2. x1 y1 x2 y2 r arcto xt1 yt1 xt2 yt2 ...


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Speaking from my own experience... There is no one answer to the question of "how is this UI interface element drawn". Under windows you can get them as freebies where the OS gives you a helping hand but windows tends to be very inflexible with its ready made UI element and tends to boil down to "styles". But windows also provides its own ...


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In QtCreator IDE (C++) any kind of image buffer - result of CPU raytracing or (what I did) frames captured from the camera can be easily rendered or painted on Widget - which is simplest part of the UI available in QtDesigner - UI designer. You could send your ray tracing engine class to another thread and use timer which every once in a while would emit ...


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