8

I'm not aware of any rendering technology designed specially for fingernails. Just eyeballing it, I would suggest that a combination of subsurface scattering with a relatively smooth glossy specular surface would get you most of the way there. In other words, you could use the same shader as you do for skin, but with different textures and different specular ...


7

I don't know of any specific technology for rendering fingernails, but I agree that using subsurface scattering with some specular would be a good starting point. A couple of things I'd take into account are that most natural nails without any coatings or nail polish aren't that shiny and have some ridges, so there should be some anisotropy to the ...


6

You probably know that the BRDF is to calculate the reflected light, from a light source to a camera (In examples a light source and a camera is used, but it does not need to be just that). The property that you are talking about, basically says that when you swap the light source with the camera, it still gives the same result. Lets look at an example I ...


4

The shape you’re trying to draw is called a catenary: it’s the shape that a cable/cord of constant density takes when supported at each end. You’ll have to do some research to find a parametric equation for its shape—this page has a start, though it doesn’t let you substitute in the endpoints so you’ll need some additional work there. Once you have an ...


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