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4 votes
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Why map Hammersley 2D set's (u,v) to sphere's (θ, φ) coordinates (and not to (φ, θ) )?

You can of course, as you suggested, map (u, v) to (φ, θ). Unfortunately, it does not solve the problem for 5 points: I've changed Holger Dammertz' code a bit (switched u and v), and you see that the ...
David Kuri's user avatar
  • 2,293
2 votes
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If a 3D scene is rendered onto a hemispherical display, will there still be warping near the edges?

There will be no distortion as long as you project the scene properly onto your virtual camera. In traditional raster graphics the scene is projected onto a plane. This makes it so that two equal ...
Sebastián Mestre's user avatar
1 vote

If a 3D scene is rendered onto a hemispherical display, will there still be warping near the edges?

Assuming each pixel is the same size then each pixel would cover the same viewing angle whether it is in the centre or towards the edge. So no, there would be no distortion.
PaulHK's user avatar
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1 vote

Why map Hammersley 2D set's (u,v) to sphere's (θ, φ) coordinates (and not to (φ, θ) )?

The "Uniform Mapping" here is incorrect. It does not transform to a uniform distribution on the sphere. Very very bad me. I misread the equation AND I didn't even consult my own reference [...
MB Reynolds's user avatar

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