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11

As usual with numerical methods and samplings, it also depends of your quality threshold of what you consider "isotropic". And of what you would consider as a being or not a "grid-based noise algorithm". For instance Gabor Noise reproduces a target spectrum, for instance blue noise, which in Fourier domain is a simple isotropic ring. Now ...


7

I believe a common solution is to split the camera transform used to project the grid from the camera transform that is used to render the grid. At perspectives close to top-down, the two cameras coincide, but as the viewing camera gets close to a horizontal perspective, the projection camera deviates and tries to keep a minimum inclination, i.e. it hovers ...


6

You can be both realistical and real-time. the secret is to change representation each time the information get under the Shannon-Nyquist (i.e. grid) scale: from geometry to normal maps to shading models. This paper is made for you: http://maverick.inria.fr/Publications/2010/BNH10/index.php (see also Yoube videos)


5

You approach will work, and in general any square of size < will work fine because the invariant "at most 1 point per square" is valid. Extrapolating from your idea, it means that one should get the best reduction in area checks for infinitesimally small squares. But we don't want to do that, right? There are two reasons why is usually better than : ...


3

Some software like Maya, solve this by using a polar (or actually cartesian that turns polar at a distance) much in the same way as you grid centered on the camera position. This setup adds more detail where it counts most Then they rely on the shaders normal processing at further ranges. There is room for improvemenet offcourse. You cold modify this ...


2

The technic what Benedikt mentioned is explained in Section 2.4.1 of this thesis. http://fileadmin.cs.lth.se/graphics/theses/projects/projgrid/projgrid-lq.pdf Implementing this should solve your problem.


2

I think the best way to tackle this problem would be to make an algorithm that works on a single triangle at a time. You'd look at each terrain triangle individually that the road intersected and process it. Looking at one triangle individually, you would have to chop that triangle into one or more meshes to make it contour to the road. Here are some of ...


1

It looks to me like you're resetting the distance calculation at each grid intersection? So every time you march another grid cell you're dividing the light intensity by $gridsize^2$ ? That would explain your observed results, since dividing by $1^2$ equals no change. It won't give you the correct result though, since to get the right attenuation you need to ...


1

Though I have never used them myself OpenGL in modern versions gives you something called "Shader Storage Buffer Object" These are buffers that you can fill with your data. They are guaranteed to be able to hold up to 16 MB of data and most implementations seem to have no problem with them taking up the whole GRAM. This feature is core since OpenGL version ...


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