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7

When a shader accesses a resource (buffer or texture), it needs some information about that resource to be able to do so correctly. On a modern GPU, that information will generally just be some kind of number. It could be something as simple as a GPU virtual memory address (with the particular details of what kind of resource is being used defined by the ...


5

First, to preface: the reason it's hard to find details about these hierarchical cluster culling systems because they are a still emerging field, at the very cutting edge of real-time rendering development. Only a handful of games/engines have successfully shipped something like this, and mostly not open source (UE5 being a recent exception). It is an area ...


3

As you have now mentionned that your computer can actually keep up (at 150 fps no less), I suspect you have a case of temporal aliasing. The problem is that 150 is not a multiple of 60. Let's say we look at one tenth of a second. That's 15 frames generated by your computer but only 6 can be shown on your screen. The frames you will see will probably be ...


2

How much data is passed from the CPU to the GPU per frame depends on the engine you are using and its needs. Usually, you want to keep it minimal to avoid that the GPU needs to wait for data because the CPU can't deliver it fast enough. I can not guarantee you, that the following is always the same for all engines and graphic APIs since I have only written ...


1

The short answer to this question is: everything On any give frame almost any kind of data my be needed to render that new and wonderful object that just popped into view. It's shader needs to be loaded and compiled, its textures, buffer data, specializations, push constants, if you can dream it up for a render call then it needs to find its way to the GPU ...


1

Any hardware in the graphics card is fixed. No, the storage of a graphics card is fixed. How that storage gets used, particularly on any semi-modern graphics card, is flexible. Essentially, what a graphics display device has is a mechanism for being told, "the bytes of video memory starting at address X is in format Y and size Z; send it at the next ...


1

Just to add to whychmaster's reply, in my experience, on a GPU, a floating-point operation, when used in quoting FLOPS (floating-point operations per second) benchmark figures will refer to Addition (equiv subtraction) and Multiplication. The other standard IEEE operators, division + sqrt, are more computationally expensive and so unlikely to be included in ...


1

Theoraticaly this can work, but I am not sure if it would be very efficient. Modern GPU's are tailored for doing low level graphics operations and the drivers that manage them are also tailored for efficiently overseeing these operations to render your scene. Now you can ask all the hardware questions related to using Raspberry Pi, how to access its cpu etc ...


1

This is more of a long comment than an answer. As with most yes or no questions in graphics, the answer is "it depends on the task". However, one particular task that you might find having multiple gpu's useful is debugging. For example if you are using cuda-gdb for debugging your CUDA application, it would be nice to have multiple gpu's, one for ...


1

Humans don't really see anything beyond 20-25 fps. Even less is often sufficient; animation at 12 frames a second work quite well too. So when you watch TV, the fps of your image is 25-30, and yet you don't generally accuse of them being not smooth. Why do games require more? Well, because they are fast paced. There is generally a slight benefit from going ...


1

Is the division of the coordinates x/w,y/w,z/w the last operation that happens on the GPU? The division you are referring to is generally called "The Perspective Divide". You can google it and get information overload on helpful documentation. The division itself happens after the geometry shader before the fragment shader as part of rasterization....


1

You are talking apples and oranges here. Copying memory to memory on the CPU is using completely different hardware then memory to memory copies on the GPU, even in a unified memory architecture GPU's tend to have specialized memory. The actual difference is going to depend heavily on the model of the GPU, a high end gddr5 gpu will easily beat DDR4 dual ...


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