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The depth of field is a characteristic of a camera lens setting, although the name "Depth of Field" is commonly used to describe the effect caused by such characteristic. Camera lenses can only perfectly focus on one single point, but there is a distance for which the image will still look reasonably sharp. Such distance is what actually the Depth Of Field ...


6

In traditional stereo 3D, I don't believe that there is a way to make a fixed focal plane feel natural to the viewer. When looking at an out-of-focus object in stereo 3D, the object remains out-of-focus, causing conflicting cues. The lens in the eye tries to adjust to bring the object into focus, but of course it won't succeed, causing eye strain and ...


5

The blog post that you talked about, is not about generating bokeh for a computer generated image. It is instead about generating a believable depth of field effect from an image captured by a smartphone camera, as the effect is desired for portraits to make the subject stand out. It generally works by splitting the image in to two parts. One part is the ...


5

The missing step If you already understand how to generate a secondary ray, then you have already grasped the difficult part. All you need to do now is find the colour that this secondary ray results in. This is exactly the same process as using the primary ray to find a colour, in basic ray tracing. After repeating this for a large number of secondary ...


3

First we can calculate the physical diameter of CoC in the image plane, given the lens parameters. This equation is from Wikipedia – Circle of confusion: $$ c = {|S_2 - S_1| \over S_2} {f^2 \over N(S_1 - f)} $$ where the variables are: $c$: the physical CoC diameter in the image plane $S_1$: focal distance (the distance at which a subject would be in ...


3

There's no visible blur for the same reason you often don't see blur in very wide angle lenses: the circle of confusion is much smaller than a pixel. But it is still there. An extreme example of this is fisheye lenses. If you had a camera with infinite resolution, such that you could zoom into the reflection on the ball, you would eventually see the blur. ...


1

Because the ball doesn't "see" the world through an imperfect lens system, whereas your camera in that case does. If you were to introduce an imperfect visual system around it, with a resulting blurring point spread function, you will get a blurry reflection.


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