5 votes
Accepted

Bokeh from depth map

The blog post that you talked about, is not about generating bokeh for a computer generated image. It is instead about generating a believable depth of field effect from an image captured by a ...
bram0101's user avatar
  • 1,605
5 votes
Accepted

Depth of Field in Path Tracing: What do I do with the secondary ray?

The missing step If you already understand how to generate a secondary ray, then you have already grasped the difficult part. All you need to do now is find the colour that this secondary ray results ...
trichoplax is on Codidact now's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Why are reflections in a spherical surface sharp, regardless of depth of field?

There's no visible blur for the same reason you often don't see blur in very wide angle lenses: the circle of confusion is much smaller than a pixel. But it is still there. An extreme example of this ...
Olivier's user avatar
  • 1,585
3 votes
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Deriving blur from real optical formulae

First we can calculate the physical diameter of CoC in the image plane, given the lens parameters. This equation is from Wikipedia – Circle of confusion: $$ c = {|S_2 - S_1| \over S_2} {f^2 \over N(...
Nathan Reed's user avatar
1 vote

Depth of Field algorithm implementation issue

If a DoN value is taken and magnified (using the circular filtering) at the highest mipmap level, M , this value (i.e., ρ(M ); see Fig. 8c) can be used for finding the foreground objects and their ...
luser droog's user avatar
  • 1,378
1 vote

Why are reflections in a spherical surface sharp, regardless of depth of field?

Because the ball doesn't "see" the world through an imperfect lens system, whereas your camera in that case does. If you were to introduce an imperfect visual system around it, with a resulting ...
lightxbulb's user avatar
  • 2,226

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