Hot answers tagged

3

That looks a lot like it’s based on the straight skeleton of some outline shapes drawn on the image. You can see similar structures in the middle one of these diagrams from a research page by Stefan Huber, one of the researchers who’s published a lot of work on straight skeletons:


3

In general this is caused by HDR tone mapping. Tonemap curves typically decrease saturation as the input light gets brighter, so that very bright lights are rendered closer to white on the display. If bloom is rendered in HDR (prior to tonemapping) then the bloom around the light can still be highly saturated since it is of a lower intensity than the light ...


3

Maybe. HDR monitors are typically going to be some approximation of the DCI-P3 color space, while Adobe's wide-color rendering is the Adobe RGB color space. The two are similar but not quite the same; in particular, Adobe RGB extends a bit further into the green-cyan range than DCI-P3 does: That said, these are only idealized color spaces, and the gamut of ...


3

Removing hue and saturation ("desaturating") leads to a grayscale image with the same luminance as the original colors, for instance: (source: my own photo) It is not possible to remove hue alone without removing saturation, as any saturated color must be saturated in some direction (hue). Nor is it possible to "split" the image into HSV ...


3

The actual color of a pixel, outputted on a monitor, does not linearly depend on the applied voltage signal for that pixel. For CRT monitors, the actual color is approximately proportional to the applied voltage raised to the power of a so-called gamma value, which depends on the monitor. This gamma value typically lies between 2.2 and 2.5 for CRT monitors. (...


3

The effect is called chromatic aberration; the way it’s usually done in games, and what’s being done there, is by reading the red / green / blue channels of an image at different offset positions. As with your other question (you’re looking to get into the NFT market, I’m guessing?), there are most likely plugins for After Effects that will let you create ...


2

This effect is called Color Cycling (or Palette Shifting). Mark Ferrari has a great GDC talk where he demonstrates and explains the entire technique. You can view a bunch of his artwork based on this technique here. The main idea is that each pixel is painted not with a single color, but as values of a look-up table to a palette of colors. The entire image ...


1

The book distinguishes a spectral power distribution from a spectral response curve because they are not the same, they are adjoint. The thing about adjoints that makes them a little tricky to wrap your head around is that they typically have the same representation in software, but keeping them distinct is extremely important in computer graphics. Another ...


1

Welcome to the world of 8-bit graphics! Other answers here are excellent, and most of what you need to know is described well on Wikipedia but let me take you on a human-friendly journey of understanding that I wish someone would have taken me on when I was younger. The first realization that you need to make is that a pixel with RGB values 128, 128, 128 ...


1

Gamma correction originated as a way of correcting the output of a CRT to be a better fit for the human visual system. Modern monitors don't need to do it, but, they followed the CRT and there were millions of CRT's that all had gamma correction and most signals already had gamma correction in them. Today we have a chicken and egg problem...but reversed. ...


1

Correct, the missing curvy section in the green-cyan-blue area represents where the red component would have to go negative to express those colors in CIE RGB coordinates. RGB and XYZ are, at one level, just different coordinate systems covering the same color space—the space of all colors visible to typical human vision. In a mathematical sense, when used ...


1

The real story here is actually very interesting and can be enlightening. So I offer this alternate answer to help better answer this question. Also, my answer below is a very specific to this question. The full story is too big to put here, but worth the trouble of learning. In the 1930-50's researchers started looking into the human visual system. These ...


1

Several reasons. Im listing them in random order There are entire industries that do other things than display things on computer screens. If you were to print a booklet, make a package, movie projection or paint a car you would probably be wise to be able to mathematically model it for design, quality control and documentation purposes. Not all screen ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible