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Here are its docs: https://processing.org/reference. Processing is described as a 'language built with the purpose of teaching non-programmers the fundamentals of computer programming in a visual context'.

However, how does this language relate to the real-world computer graphics tools?

For example:

  • Is it similar to some low-level library maybe?
  • Is the concept of a repeating draw() { background(255) } (in order to draw each new frame of an animation) used in real-world libraries?
  • Are the same methods/concepts used (pushMatrix, popMatrix, rotate, translate)?
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  • $\begingroup$ The problem here is the definition of "real-world computer graphics tools". As long as there is no more or less exact definition of this term, answers will be heavily biased. $\endgroup$
    – haggi krey
    Apr 26, 2018 at 8:15
  • $\begingroup$ @haggikrey, ones I can earn money with. $\endgroup$ May 14, 2018 at 13:31

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It does not relate to low level libraries. Yes, usually each frame is drawn separately, nothing can change if i dont change anything. However the draw loop is often handled by somebody else in for example game engines, etc. So in fact processing is often lower level stuff than what many people would do day to day.

Pushing matrix state is pretty common, it exists even in graphics languages from 1970's.

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  • $\begingroup$ > It does not relate to low level libraries., > So in fact processing is often lower level stuff than what many people would do day to day. --- So does it relate to low-level libraries or not? $\endgroup$ Mar 24, 2018 at 0:21
  • $\begingroup$ @lakesare No it does not. Lower, does not mean low. In fact low level graphics libraries are rare, mainly because modern systems really dont want you poking in the fabric of the OS. So even something as fundamental as OpenGL is a high level library youd need to go into something like Vulkan to go low enough to be considered low level. But without this kind if high level abstraction it would be impossible to be compatible across devices. $\endgroup$
    – joojaa
    Mar 24, 2018 at 8:50

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