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This is more just for curiosity rather than actually wanting to get one, but is there a place where I could buy a printed version of the CIE xy colour space diagram which accurately recreates all of the visible colours outside of the regular printing gamuts?

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Its not actually possible to do. Because that paper you print on needs to have properties not avalialbe. The color on the edge are very pure and can not be mixed. I dont also see any way they could be reflected either. Also the xy diagram is not the full color space just a slice of it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Ok, how about something more specific: A surface with reflectance properties such that if you shine D65 on it a CIE standard observer would get XYZ tristimulus values which could be projected onto a maxwell triangle to build a diagram in x and y. It would be insanely difficult but should it not be possible in theory? $\endgroup$
    – Chuck
    Dec 12, 2017 at 20:52
  • $\begingroup$ @Chuck No, it would require each element in the poster to have different wavelength charactersitics, white of the paper would aslo have to be perfect. Its not pssible to do this atleast untill we can print stuff that behaves like butterfly wings. Printing simply does not work this way. Its not just insanely expensive it requires tech we do not have. $\endgroup$
    – joojaa
    Dec 14, 2017 at 10:01
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I think there is no point pursuing "objective accuracy" for colors, because individual perception of colors is different. The current standard is merely a statistical result for human eye perception. That is to say, it is possible for someone else to perceive the colors you regard identical as different.

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    $\begingroup$ Yes that's a good point but I still think it might make a cool poster or something if you had the "standard observer" calibrated diagram. $\endgroup$
    – Chuck
    Dec 12, 2017 at 20:45

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