3
$\begingroup$

What's the meaning of the "dynamic" in "high dynamic range"?

Why use this word?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I imagine it's been borrowed from audio where, I guess, it implies you can have accurate reproduction at both high and low volumes (within the same piece of music) $\endgroup$ – Simon F Nov 3 '17 at 8:39
5
$\begingroup$

Dynamic, adjective:

1: pertaining to or characterized by energy or effective action; vigorously active or forceful; energetic:

...

4: of or relating to the range of volume of musical sound.

HDR allows you to deal with high light energies. And such high energies could be characterized as being "vigorously active or forceful; energetic".

But I think the fourth definition is more suitable. Graphics and rendering are forms of signal processing, much like sound. So they share a lot in common. For example, the term "aliasing" originated in digital conversion of sound.

"High light energies" are the visual equivalent of "volume" in sound. So the "dynamic range" that you can record, the "range of volume" is high, as opposed to low.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_range

Dynamic range, abbreviated DR, DNR, or DYR is the ratio between the largest and smallest values that a certain quantity can assume.

In the case of HDR, this refers to the ratio of the highest/lowest luminance values that can be perceived or represented.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
-3
$\begingroup$

High Dynamic range, somtimes use as a feature in still image or in higher level in rolling image. It means that your shot has been captured by camera that can hold all information about exposure (at least in 3 modes: Overexpos, Normal and Underexpos). It is happening in high-end camera and high-end project. With this feature, you have alot of control in CC step like a pro.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ That's a nice explanation, but seems to miss answering the actual question, which didn't ask for what HDR is but just what the D in there derives from etymologically. $\endgroup$ – Christian Rau Nov 7 '17 at 9:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.