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Say I am running a game in the cloud and I am playing that game on my client (the game is being streamed from the cloud to the client), be it a laptop, phone or calculator.

How can I work out how long a frame (of the game being played) takes to arrive at the client?

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closed as off-topic by trichoplax, Julien Guertault, joojaa, RichieSams, glampert Oct 9 '15 at 19:18

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about computer graphics, within the scope defined in the help center." – trichoplax, Julien Guertault, joojaa, RichieSams, glampert
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ This seems to have a couple of problems. a) It's not entirely clear whether you're the developer or just a player of the game (in the latter case, this is clearly off-topic, as this site is about computer graphics programming and research). b) If you are the developer this doesn't seem to be actually about graphics but more about the network code of your game. In that case, you might want to try GameDev.SE or Stack Overflow but be sure to read their respective help centres to make sure your question is of high-quality and on-topic. $\endgroup$ – Martin Ender Nov 3 '15 at 8:50
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Try putting a timestamp over some key frames as the last step on your render pipeline. Then compare it to the local systems time. If both clocks are correct you should get a delay in ms (using unix rime-stamps).

Another idea to measure the round-trip-delay (might be important for UX reasons): input to server, server render, result from to server on your screen is to have a bot give an input than measure the time till the result is back

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  • $\begingroup$ How would I go about accessing the key frames? I'm not really sure where to start. The game would be streamed from the cloud to a client. Thanks $\endgroup$ – pookie Oct 7 '15 at 11:29
  • $\begingroup$ maybe try to record it and than search them by hand. I know this is far away from any kind of automated test or even realtime feedback, but it seemed to be the rather uncomplicated $\endgroup$ – Nils Oct 12 '15 at 7:28

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