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I am a newbie in Computer graphics and trying to implement Dynamic Fusion following the paper. I can understand most of the paper, but there is this line bothering me "rendering the warped surface into the live frame shaded with canonical frame vertex positions using a rasterizing rendering pipeline." in section 3.3.1. It is unclear to me what "shaded with vertex positions" means because I thought you need light and camera position to do it, i.e. there is no input as "vertex position" for shading. I tried to re-read wikipedia and opengl, but I can't find the term "shaded with vertex position".

Currently I am using z-buffering to render the depth image from the surface and computing vertex and normal mapsfrom resulted depth maps for other computations. However, that line is still bugging me because clearly I don't have enough knowledge to understand it. I hope someone could help me.

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    $\begingroup$ Could it just mean the position of the vertex used as the colour of the fragment? $\endgroup$
    – dubious
    Oct 27, 2022 at 13:44

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A couple sentences later, they say:

We store this prediction as a pair of images $\{ \mathbf{v}, \mathbf{n} \} : \Omega \mapsto \mathcal{P}(\mathcal{\hat V}_c)$, where $\Omega$ is the pixel domain of the predicted images, storing the rendered canonical frame vertices and normals.

So it sounds like what they're doing is rendering the warped geometry using a fragment shader that outputs to multiple render targets (perhaps using floating-point texture formats), and stores the original vertex positions and normals to those render targets.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. This actually makes a lot of sense. The goal of rendering is to mark which point in canonical space is visible. This is similar to an ICP idea of closest matching by projecting to destination mesh. This is the first time I heard of shaded with vertex position. But with your interpretation, it makes sense with ICP methods. $\endgroup$ Oct 28, 2022 at 14:11

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