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Simple question: is there a source that precedes the idea of presenting graphical application or 3D scene in a scene graph?

I came across Hierarchical geometric models for visible surface algorithms which introduces the idea of having the geometry in easily searchable and cullable format. So I wonder if this is the father of the idea of having scene graph, or has there been something published earlier with this idea.

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    $\begingroup$ Very difficult to say if it is earliest for sure but E. Warnock invented the Warnock algorithm which recursively subdivides a scene and determines what parts of surfaces are hidden in his phd thesis at 1969. $\endgroup$ – Kaan E. Feb 19 at 13:42
  • $\begingroup$ Id like to point out that systems that could redraw the screen all must have some sort of scene graph even though your not aware that it should be called that.even if its totally bastardized. $\endgroup$ – joojaa Mar 2 at 18:29
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Not 3D as such, but it seems in 1963 Ivan Sutherland's seminal "Sketchpad" (and wikipedia) had instancing. eg. See "Chapter VI RECURSIVE FUNCTIONS" of the 2nd reference.

IIRC somewhere there's a video of it in action - it made me annoyed as to how some of today's vector drawing tools don't seem to be able to do some of what sketchpad appeared to support.

Update: @Joojaa has kindly located a video or this

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    $\begingroup$ We arent necceserily getting better tools due to the masses dragging down on progress. It is often so that pioneers often had features that took others years to realize they need. But then sketchpad describes a cad system thats not at all the same as a vector drawing package. You have all this in something like autocad. And link m.youtube.com/watch?v=57wj8diYpgY $\endgroup$ – joojaa Mar 2 at 17:53
  • $\begingroup$ I was thinking specifically of a diagram drawing packages that shall remain nameless but are forced upon me and colleagues. Things that would make life so much more pleasant that are missing, yet were implemented on a "steam-powered" computer from the 60s :-/ $\endgroup$ – Simon F Mar 3 at 7:08
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    $\begingroup$ Aah the most (mis)used vector package out there, Sympathies. $\endgroup$ – joojaa Mar 3 at 8:29

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